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Posts Tagged ‘eye appeal’

UK’s Daily Mirror Blogs Infographics

December 27, 2013 Leave a comment

Ampp3d — launched in November — makes “journalism more accessible through data visualisations.”

The Ampp3d  blog  focuses on the Daily Mirror’s “charts, graphs, facts, figures and … infographics” by collecting and presenting in one place the data visualizations published in the Mirror. Ammp3d demonstrates that infographics do not need to be elaborate to add impact to a story and satisfy readers. It is one of many examples of journalists using graphics to appeal to younger audiences (and help with the ever-important subscriber figures).

Mirror-Tax graph

Here’s everything you need to know about Beyoncé, in numbers.

Overstacking Bars

Mint goes too far with a stacked column chart

Mint-IncomeDistributionStackBar

This stacked column chart is certainly pretty, but falls down on usability. It does not make it easy to compare income levels across states. Reading across the bottom it works for the lowest income group and reading across the top it works for the highest. For the five groups in between it does not work at all because there is no common point of reference. It is very difficult to compare an inner bar to any other inner bar.

This infographic would be less pretty, but far more useful if each group was displayed in its own row with a common zero line. Then the eye could easily scan across to spot the highs and lows.

The lesson is that a stacked column or bar chart can be useful at times, but only when a small number of comparisons are made or when the differences among the bars is very evident. Otherwise, don’t do it!

The Best American Infographics 2013

Book highlights the finest infographics from the past year.

Displays an incredible variety of high-quality graphics ranging from highly technical to whimsical. The book demonstrates many styles and many ways to visually communicate data and ideas. An invaluable source of inspiration.

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Pie Chart Phobia?

GoodReader Avoids Pie, But Does This Serve the Reader?

This overly elaborate infographic presents the same information as a classic pie chart or even a table. Does it do it better? I think not.

Badbook

It could be that the publication thinks a classic pie or table does not match the image they want to present. Unfortunately, this chaotic presentation makes it much harder for the reader to make sense of the information.

Either a pie or a table sorted by percentage would quickly communicate the top reasons for quitting. This presentation leaves the reader hunting for key information. Why this jumbled spatial arrangement?

The leading factor is labeled in slightly larger type and bolded, but the significance is lost in a sea of bad typography. No typographic hierarchy is maintained in the rest of the labels. Why so many crummy fonts?

Say, what makes you stop reading an infographic?

Designers Outraged at US Gov Spys

PRISM PowerPoints Not So Hot

The revelation that the U.S. Government is spying on the Internet outraged pundits, politicians and rights advocates. After the Washington Post published the slides the design community was outraged too. I think the information content of the slides is actually not so terrible. The problem is the hideously ugly artwork. The design skills of whoever created these slides is appallingly low. Poor presentation detracts from the message so much that it slows comprehension. This is a great illustration of why design skill is an important part of effective communication.

 

Dreadful spy-PRISM deck sets new record for most header logos — Edward Tufte

 

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Cascade of Pies Intrigues

iStrategy arranges pie charts to explore relationships and display relative importance

This alternative to a simple rectilinear arrangement of charts is not only more visually appealing, but also encourages the viewer to consider how the different datasets relate to each other. At the top of the infographic a bright red pie shows the total media market. As the viewer travels downward, different aspects of the mobile market are presented. Related topics are grouped and identically colored. Additional breakdowns of pie slices are shown as overlapping pies.

Pies-NETDNA-anatomy-of-the-mobile-market 2

Sometimes Less Communicates More

November 28, 2012 Leave a comment

Chart of the Day replots IBM data

This re-plotting of the IBM data is not only more visually appealing, but eliminates the clutter that made the original so difficult to understand. Perhaps it eliminates too much: the pie chart of the left would be more understandable if the slices added up to 100%. Adding a 76% wedge for the for non-mobile devices would help us understand the big picture. Nevertheless, the pie chart on the right is the meat of the story, does add up to 100%, and communicates the point of the story very clearly. Why did all those recently-sold Android devices end up lost in the sock drawer?